Consumers Find Ways to Spend Less and Find Happiness

Posted on by

NY TIMES- She had so much. A two-bedroom apartment. Two cars. Enough wedding china to serve two dozen people.

Yet Tammy Strobel wasn’t happy. Working as a project manager with an investment management firm in Davis, Calif., and making about $40,000 a year, she was, as she put it, caught in the “work-spend treadmill.”

So one day she stepped off.

Inspired by books and blog entries about living simply, Ms. Strobel and her husband, Logan Smith, both 31, began donating some of their belongings to charity. As the months passed, out went stacks of sweaters, shoes, books, pots and pans, even the television after a trial separation during which it was relegated to a closet. Eventually, they got rid of their cars, too. Emboldened by a Web site that challenges consumers to live with just 100 personal items, Ms. Strobel winnowed down her wardrobe and toiletries to precisely that number.

Her mother called her crazy.

Today, three years after Ms. Strobel and Mr. Smith began downsizing, they live in Portland, Ore., in a spare, 400-square-foot studio with a nice-sized kitchen. Mr. Smith is completing a doctorate in physiology; Ms. Strobel happily works from home as a Web designer and freelance writer. She owns four plates, three pairs of shoes and two pots. With Mr. Smith in his final weeks of school, Ms. Strobel’s income of about $24,000 a year covers their bills. They are still car-free but have bikes. One other thing they no longer have: $30,000 of debt.

Ms. Strobel’s mother is impressed. Now the couple have money to travel and to contribute to the education funds of nieces and nephews. And because their debt is paid off, Ms. Strobel works fewer hours, giving her time to be outdoors, and to volunteer, which she does about four hours a week for a nonprofit outreach program called Living Yoga.

“The idea that you need to go bigger to be happy is false,” she says. “I really believe that the acquisition of material goods doesn’t bring about happiness.”

While Ms. Strobel and her husband overhauled their spending habits before the recession, legions of other consumers have since had to reconsider their own lifestyles, bringing a major shift in the nation’s consumption patterns.

“We’re moving from a conspicuous consumption — which is ‘buy without regard’ — to a calculated consumption,” says Marshal Cohen, an analyst at the NPD Group, the retailing research and consulting firm.

Amid weak job and housing markets, consumers are saving more and spending less than they have in decades, and industry professionals expect that trend to continue. Consumers saved 6.4 percent of their after-tax income in June, according to a new government report. Before the recession, the rate was 1 to 2 percent for many years. In June, consumer spending and personal incomes were essentially flat compared with May, suggesting that the American economy, as dependent as it is on shoppers opening their wallets and purses, isn’t likely to rebound anytime soon.

On the bright side, the practices that consumers have adopted in response to the economic crisis ultimately could — as a raft of new research suggests — make them happier. New studies of consumption and happiness show, for instance, that people are happier when they spend money on experiences instead of material objects, when they relish what they plan to buy long before they buy it, and when they stop trying to outdo the Joneses.

If consumers end up sticking with their newfound spending habits, some tactics that retailers and marketers began deploying during the recession could become lasting business strategies. Among those strategies are proffering merchandise that makes being at home more entertaining and trying to make consumers feel special by giving them access to exclusive events and more personal customer service.

While the current round of stinginess may simply be a response to the economic downturn, some analysts say consumers may also be permanently adjusting their spending based on what they’ve discovered about what truly makes them happy or fulfilled.

Read full article about Consumers Finding Ways to Spend Less and Find Happiness.

© COPYRIGHT NY TIMES, 2010

Photo by flickr user epSos.de




Leave a Reply

RELATED NEWS

  • From Squawk Box to CSPAN – Cutting Through the Beltway Bubble & Democracy Gap
  • Digital Currencies and Privacy Protection
  • Modern Money, Public Purpose, and Democracy
  • Obama’s Austerity Agenda And Sequestration
  • WORLD NEWS

  • Ultra-Orthodox Jews in Israel Draw the Line
  • Bhutan’s Missing Pillar of Happiness: The Truth
  • How Neoliberalism and NGOs Stunt Civil Society: Reflections on Palestine
  • Jeremy Scahill Talks About “Dirty Wars”
  • Breaking the Myths about Hugo Chavez
  • MR Original – The Times’ Operations
  • Israel Launches Aggressive Attack In Gaza
  • NYPD: A Homegrown Terrorist Cell
  • No Easy Truth: Continuous Casualty of Conflict
  • Keiser: Global Economic Collapse by 2013?
  • The Real Global 1% Ruling Class
  • MR Original – Part Two The Iranian Neighborhood
  • Bride Kidnappings in Half of all Kyrgyzstan Weddings
  • MR Original – From Persia To Iran
  • How the Times of India Colluded With Monsanto